Basic RESTful Service – Part I

One can use different programming languages, frameworks and libraries to develop a RESTful web server which exposes the same API. In this post I will implement a RESTful server using JavaScript, Express, and npm libraries.

Given that one needs to start with some level of requirements, we will use the following short and simple statement:

“Implement a very simple RESTful API for a storage server that supports store, query, retrieve and delete operations using DICOM data”. Continue reading “Basic RESTful Service – Part I”

A Simple API

I always like to spend some time reviewing and learning new stuff before starting a project or task. The amount of time depends on the urgency of the task. In this case I went over chapter 2 of RESTful Web APIs by Leonard Richardson and Mike Amundsen.

As I have mentioned several times, I like to research a think about the task, implement a Minimum Viable Product (MVP) and with the remaining time enhance the software until the scheduled time runs out. Based on my experience, this approach is welcomed by most customers and development teams. When I say research and think, depending on the level and type of the task (e.g., architecting, designing, implementing), such activities may take from an hour or so to several days or weeks. The time is greatly reduced when you constantly read and experiment and when the task is implementation (i.e., generating and testing code). Continue reading “A Simple API”

Curl to call RESTful API

In this post I will perform some basic interactions with a RESTful service running on ASP.NET written in C#. I will access the RESTful server using the cURL (a.k.a. curl) command line interface. On a future post I will access the curl API using the C# programming language to illustrate its use. Continue reading “Curl to call RESTful API”