Rabin-Karp Algorithm

It is a cooler summer Saturday in the Twin Cities of Minneapolis and St. Paul. My wife and I are planning to go out for lunch. As soon as she is ready we should leave.

In the recent posts “MongoDB Text Search” and “Find Damaged – Part II” for one reason or another I have been dealing with full text searches. The MongoDB post covers how to use text searches in the database. A software engineer was in the process of experimenting with MongoDB on the cloud (Atlas) and was interested in performing text searches. The need was associated with a work related request. Continue reading “Rabin-Karp Algorithm”

Find Damaged – Part II

As I mentioned my previous post, my wife and I went to visit for the first time my son and family after his move from Indiana to Wisconsin. It used to be about 10 hours by car and about two hours by plane. The latter did not include the time from home to the airport, the wait at the airport, picking up luggage in the Indianapolis airport, and driving about an hour to his previous residence. Taking that into account if we fly to Madison, WI it would probably be a wash driving versus flying.

His new place is in a very nice development. The weather was hot and muggy. We walked the dog twice. We have to feed the Fitbit. The guest room is a lot nicer than the one in the previous house. The actual bed was firmer. For some reason or another I was not able to sleep well. Woke up on Sunday morning at 01:37 AM and did not go back to sleep until around 04:30 AM. Continue reading “Find Damaged – Part II”

Securing MongoDB

Today is a summer Saturday morning in the Twin Cities of Minneapolis and St. Paul. It is not as bright as usual, it appears to be cloudy but it is relatively early. I woke up around 04:30 AM and decided to get up, read the news for a few minutes, and then decided to write this posts. My motivation is twofold. The first and most important is due to the fact that I am officially starting a new project at work using MongoDB. I will be using a local version of MongoDB which later will be moved to use Atlas on the cloud. The database will contain sensitive patient data. The second is the number of recent posts regarding data leaks on NoSQL bases. This morning I just read “MongoDB Leak Exposed Millions of Medical Insurance Records” which seems to illustrate the fact that people forgets to secure their MongoDB instance. Continue reading “Securing MongoDB”

DynamoDB

I do not like to live of past memories but this morning I spent a few minutes updating the About me … section in this blog. I included the fact that since my early 20’s I started dabbling with starting my own businesses. At the time I got together with a couple friends and opened a liquor store. I was able to secure beer distribution of one of the largest breweries in Peru. The rules are that breweries sell only via distributors and distributors only sell to liquor stores. About a year after, I sold the business due to the fact that I received a scholarship to attend Cornell University and permanently move to the USA.

Continue reading “DynamoDB”

MongoDB for RESTful Service

In the past few days the temperature in the Twin Cities of Minneapolis and St. Paul has been lower than average. The days have been cloudy and rainy. Today the sun might peak in the afternoon and the temperature will hopefully reach 55 F. On the positive side the forecast for Saturday is sunny and temperatures in the low 70s. Hopefully will be able to grill and spend a few hours outside walking.

In this post I will cover interacting with MongoDB using Node.js via the Mongoose module. I will not say much about Installing MongoDB on Windows or Using the MongoDB Shell due to the fact that I have covered such topics on previous posts. I am using the Windows 10 OS due to the fact that several tools I use to generate the post are installed in this Windows machine. You can follow just as well if you decide to use Linux. The installation instructions provided by MongoDB are well written and are easy to follow. Continue reading “MongoDB for RESTful Service”

About JavaScript – Part I

This morning I received a message from a discussion forum for the Graph Analytics for Big Data from the University of California San Diego by Coursera. I completed the course last year.

I tend to post now and then when I really see a need. Since then at least three students have used the contents of the post and were kind enough to leave me a message. I do appreciate it. Hope it helps fellow students even if they were in a hurry and did not have time to leave a thank you note. Feels good, what can I say. Continue reading “About JavaScript – Part I”

CRUD Minus R on Mongo DB

20,000 American Flags are displayed for every resident of Massachusetts who died in a war over the past 100 years, Boston Common, Boston, MA, Memorial Day, 2011

It is a beautiful day in the Twin Cities of Minneapolis and St. Paul part of the Memorial Day 2018 weekend. The forecast calls for very warm days. On Monday the temperature will be reaching 95F. My wife and I decided to go for a walk first thing in the morning. Today Saturday we got up at our usual time (05:30 AM CDT), had breakfast (yogurt, granola, blueberries, strawberries, bananas and a cup of milk with a shot of espresso) and headed out. As the walk progressed, we ran into several people getting their daily walk out of the way in order to avoid the high temperatures. Showered and sat in front of my computer. I will be working for the next four hours or so. This afternoon my wife and I will attempt a walk around one of the lakes in Minneapolis. Will be very hot but we are planning on a stroll and a stop for ice cream and water. Continue reading “CRUD Minus R on Mongo DB”

Using the MongoDB Shell

I believe it was Albert Einstein who said “Any man who reads too much and uses his own brain too little falls into lazy habits of thinking”. I like to read in order to learn about different subjects, mostly associated with computer science and technology. I also like to experiment with what I am reading in order to verify that I understand the material. Continue reading “Using the MongoDB Shell”

Radix Sort

Earlier this week I ran into a description of Radix Sort. This sorting algorithm has been around for a few centuries (yes; that is not a typo). The algorithm dates back to 1887 to the work of Herman Hollerith (and yes; he was the inventor of the Hollerith Card Code for punched cards used in the past century).

This sorting algorithm is not the fastest, it requires additional space, but has been around for a long time. When you read about it, seems like it should not work; but it does. Continue reading “Radix Sort”