Singleton Threads

My wife and I enjoy cooking and of course eating the food we prepare. Yesterday we decided to making from scratch empanadas. Different cultures around the world have come up with similar implementations. I am not a historian so I am not sure if all foods covered in some type of dough and then baked or deep fried, are derived from a single version or instance (the Computer Science shows up).

In the US we refer to a similar object with the name turnover. My wife’s family comes from Spain. According to this article the name empanada was mentioned in a book published in Catalan as early as 1520. It seems that one should be able to find the best recipes for empanadas in and around Barcelona. Next time we are in that area will make sure to have some empanadas.

My parents came from Italy. As a matter of fact I am first generation not born in Genoa.  In Italy there are similar foods named calzone and Stromboli both of which we had on my parents table quite often while growing up.

While searching the web with Chrome, I found this site which lists some foods related to empanadas. Empanadas enclose some type of food in dough while a food that is quite common in the US, presents the food in an open face version. That is what pizzas are all about. You can read more about pizza here. The modern pizza was created in Napoli, Italy, and yes my wife and I have been to the restaurant that claims to have created the Neapolitan pizza.

So back to yesterday, my wife made about seven pounds of empanada stuffing (beef, onions, eggs, garlic, and many other spices). I made a batch of dough (flour, yeast, olive oil, and a few more ingredients) which was enough to make about 18 empanadas. While we were preparing the food, one of my wife’s nice stopped by. Apparently she was interested in joining us for lunch. While we were chatting, my son calls. One thing and the other and he (plus wife and two sons) requested some empanadas for Sunday. We where forgetting that two of my in-laws and spouses were stopping by around 02:00 PM for lunch.

Panic mode set in. We had plenty of stuffing, but not enough dough. I made a second batch. As the empanadas were taking shape, I made a third batch. Of course the dough did not have enough time to rise, but it had to be done. When all was set and done, we ended with around six dozen empanadas. We were baking them in batches so things were moving along.

Our formal guests arrived so we all had empanadas with lime, beer, and wine. On Friday, my wife had prepared a couple gypsy arms stuffed with “dulce de leche”. We forgot to serve the salad but I had more than enough to eat and drink. We did not have a chance to walk outside yesterday. That said; I checked my fitbit before going to bed. I had about 10,500 steps. I was pleasantly surprised with the final tally.

Today we are going out for Chinese food. We do not wish to cook. Continue reading “Singleton Threads”

TensorFlow 2.0 – Linux Installation

Over the weekend a fellow software developer sent me an email message with a question regarding the JUnit Example post. Given that the interchange did not occur via the message section following all posts, I will not post the sequence of messages. The question was not regarding an existing test case in the TriangleTest class. What he was interested in is a new test case in which one could generate a text file with the information to run multiple (e.g., 100) test cases at once. If you are interested you can find the proposed solution in my GitHub repository. I post it as a second branch. I will not be merging branches due to the fact that this modification would not work with the original challenge. In addition, I did modify the test scaffolding on the Solution not to prompt for the lengths of the sides in the triangle. It is easier to copy and paste the sides that to be prompted for each side separately. Continue reading “TensorFlow 2.0 – Linux Installation”

Checking Docker Installation on Linux

I am starting some work using Docker containers and as usual I like to spend some time refreshing and checking all is well before starting the actual development. Such approach seems to allow me to catch up issues before they cause bugs during the software development cycle.

Last year I wrote a post with the instructions I followed while installing Docker on my CentOS 7 Linux machine. If you are about to install Docker, their website appears to have up to data instructions for different operating systems. Continue reading “Checking Docker Installation on Linux”

Closed my Linkedin Account

This morning I finally had time to close my Linkedin account. I had been thinking to close the account for a couple years. In that time I have logged in a few times a year. I have seldom contacted people in my ‘network’. For the people I care to keep in touch with, I use email, my cell phone and text messages. That said; in the past few years I have been thinking about two reasons to close the account. Continue reading “Closed my Linkedin Account”

Machine Learning – Setup

I am constantly reading and experimenting to learn things which I may apply to work projects. A few years ago I decided to spent time on and off learning machine learning (ML). With that purpose in mind, I got a number of books on different subjects (e.g., Deep Learning, Python and Statistics) which seemed to be useful to achieve my goal.

On the platform side, I started experimenting on Windows. Most things work fine but some things do not. For example, I had to wait to use Tensorflow because it ran on Linux but not on Windows. Today it seems to work on both. The same seems to hold true for Docker. Continue reading “Machine Learning – Setup”

Managing Binary Trees – Linux

This post deals with an API for binary trees in Linux. The API consists of the following functions:

Function Brief Description
tdelete() Deletes an item from a tree.
tdestroy() Deletes the entire tree.
tfind() Finds an item and if not found returns NULL.
tsearch() Search a binary tree for an item.
twalk() Performs a depth-first, left to right tree traversal.

In the past I have used and implemented, using different programming languages, several classes, methods and functions to deal with binary trees. Binary trees are used to keep data in sorted order. This allows for quicker search times. This particular implementation comes with the Linux operating system. You can read more about it by typing on a Linux console:  man twalk Continue reading “Managing Binary Trees – Linux”

Bash on Ubuntu on Windows

I have been working and developing software on Linux, UNIX and Windows for a while. On the Microsoft platforms I started on MS DOS. Last week I was talking with a colleague and he mentioned that while still in BETA, Microsoft has something called Bash on Ubuntu on Windows. I do enjoy the simplicity and power of the Linux shells. I decided to give the Microsoft BETA software a run. Continue reading “Bash on Ubuntu on Windows”