Partial Retrieve from Encrypted Store

In a previous post we covered the retrieval of data from a store. It was described that the data at rest and in transit were not encrypted. The reason was that the store was deployed in facilities behind the firewall. Access from the outside was not allowed.

As time changed, data was only encrypted in transit using secure sockets or HTTPS. Given that facilities had to allow remote access, it made sense to encrypt the data at rest. When a client application would request data, the storage server would decrypt the file and send it to the requesting client via a secure protocol. Continue reading “Partial Retrieve from Encrypted Store”

Encrypted Store

This post has to do with encrypting data in a storage server. When the storage server in question was architected and implemented the data at rest and in transit were raw (unencrypted). The main reason was that clients and servers where deployed in the same facility.

Years when by and the requirements called for encrypting data in transit while the data at rest was left raw. Encrypting data in transit could be performed by using HTTPS, secure sockets or encrypting the data when retrieved from the servers and decrypting by clients when received. Storing data would be the opposite. The initial decision, given that the client and server where under control, was to encrypt transmissions using the Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) which was designed by Vincent Rijmen and Joan Daemen back in 1998. Continue reading “Encrypted Store”

Neo4j and Dijkstra’s SSSP

The workday is starting to wind down slowly. I have been doing some cosmetic changes and running tests on a medical storage server. No matter what you change you must always run tests to make sure all is well.

On my last post I covered Dijkstra’s algorithm for shortest path. Shortest path implies distance and not number of vertices traversed.

Continue reading “Neo4j and Dijkstra’s SSSP”

Issues while Installing Hadoop on Windows

I am always trying to read and practice with topics / subjects that I feel learning or call my attention. I am currently taking some specialization courses on Coursera. You can never give up and stop learning. In this post I will describe how I installed Hadoop and the issues I encountered. Continue reading “Issues while Installing Hadoop on Windows”

Castor Framework

My wife and I are going to attend a wedding on July 5th. I am going to wear black dress shoes. A week or so ago while at Nordstrom’s at the MOA I was going to get a pair of shoes for the occasion. My wife mentioned that I have a pair of never worn black shoes still in their box. This morning, my wife gave me the shoes. I decided to wear them at home for a few days in order to make them mold to my feet. Seems like most of the times I wear new shoes I get blisters on my feet. I am the type of person that wears thick socks even when wearing sandals. Will see how things went after the wedding. Continue reading “Castor Framework”

Kubernetes

Kubernetes, it appears to me to be a funny sounding word that could be uttered by an actor in a science fiction movie. If interested in the actual origin of the word, take a look at the following Kubernetes link in Wikipedia.

I am more interested in what it does than how the word came to be (even though I did read the entire Wikipedia article). In the book Production-Ready Microservices by Susan J. Fowler; published by O’Reilly (which I purchased from Amazon and read), a nice and simple diagram is used to describe the four-layer model of the microservice ecosystem. Continue reading “Kubernetes”

ASP.NET Core

I apologize for not being consistent on my posts. Technology and projects change quite rapidly so what might be of interest today might not be in a few weeks. In the past few weeks a decision was made to use the Windows platform to develop the next generation of a storage server. The storage server will be developed using ASP.NET Core. Due to that fact, I have been experimenting with the ASP.NET Core SDK and runtime. Yes, the last statement is not a typo. The ASP.NET Core has a SDK using its own version number and a runtime using a different version number. Continue reading “ASP.NET Core”

Asymmetric and Symmetric Encryption

A couple weeks ago I was reading and experimenting with OAuth 2.0. I have been learning (it is a never ending task) and using encryption for at least a couple decades. Have developed some hashing algorithms to hash software licenses, but have never attempted to develop a full encryption algorithm. Continue reading “Asymmetric and Symmetric Encryption”

Jamboard or Surface Hub?

It just happens that I work remotely. Have been doing so for a few years. Working remotely has a few advantages and disadvantages. As we know in software engineering there is no silver bullet. One of the disadvantages is the quality and features of collaboration tools (hardware and software). Continue reading “Jamboard or Surface Hub?”

OAuth 2.0

OpenID Connect 1.0 is a simple identity layer on top of the OAuth 2.0 protocol. It allows Clients to verify the identity of the End-User based on the authentication performed by an Authorization Server, as well as to obtain basic profile information about the End-User in an interoperable and REST-like manner.

OpenID Connect allows clients of all types, including Web-based, mobile, and JavaScript clients, to request and receive information about authenticated sessions and end-users. Continue reading “OAuth 2.0”